Bee Sweet

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Hi Kids. Today’s post is going to pay tribute to the Honeybee.  

But first, we’re going to begin class with a cocktail!

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The Bee’s Knees

2 oz. gin

1/2 ounce honey syrup

1/2 ounce fresh lemon juice

1 round slice honeycomb (optional, but mandatory for Slim Paley readers 🙂 )

Combine liquid ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake well; strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with lemon and honeycomb.

*To turn viscous honey into a syrup add a small amount of boiling water until just pourable.

Recipe via Bastille, Seattle.


Chopard black & yellow diamond brooch

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I’ve always found something perversely fascinating about the art of beekeeping…kind of cool, but I’d never want to do it… am I alone?  I’d venture not, and yet it seems to be very much in vogue, particularly with freshly focused restaurants dedicated to bringing nature to the table as directly as possible, in some cases even keeping bees on the roof of their establishments.  I’m not really a huge honey fan, but I certainly appreciate the infinite ways in which the bees and their product have enriched our lives and our tables for thousands of years.  


Stubbs & Wootton slippers

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Honey has been used in Ayurveda medicine in India for over 4,000 years. Both the Egyptians and the Chinese as far back as 2,000 BC  used honey in their medical compounds and the Ancient Greeks believed it promoted virility and longevity.

Due to it’s powerful anti-bacterial properties, it’s been used for everything from ulcers and cataracts to salve for amputations and acne..

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Honey supposedly makes a great moisturizing facial & hair mask;

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As a moisturizing pack:
Things you need:

  • Honey – 2 teaspoons
  • Whole milk – 2 teaspoons

Procedure: Combine milk and honey into a smooth consistency. Now apply this on the neck and face. Allow it to sit for nearly 15 – 20 minutes and then rinse with cold water.

As a facial:
Things you need:

  • Procedure: Mix avocado, oatmeal, olive oil and honey in a bowl. Now apply this mixture on the neck and face by making circularmotions. Let it stay for 15 – 20 minutes and then wash off with warm water.

via Drgranny.com.

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Honeycomb chandelier from Further Design.

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Honey dispensers from the Moma Shop NYC

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Honey is an enormously-complex food with a chemical composition that includes amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and enzymes – about 180 substances in all.

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Tokyo Milk  “Honey & The Moon” collection

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Honey is a miracle food; it never goes bad.

It was reported that archaeologists found 2000 year old jars of honey in Egyptian tombs that still tasted delicious!

The unique chemical composition of low water content and relatively high acidic level in honey creates a low pH environment that makes it very unfavourable for bacteria or other micro-organism to grow.

It would be like, say, trying to become friends with The Housewives of NYC…not gonna happen

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The historic foyer of La Gaite Lyrique, Paris

Stubbs & Wootton

(BTW, ever since Tom Ford did those insanely gorgeous black evening slippers for his men’s collection, I’ve been loving my old Stubbs & Woottons again)

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honeycomb lights from Shadyshade

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Photo taken by my friend R.B. with his iphone!

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Jan Showers Collection

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.A honey of a space  (sorry)

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Liquid gold chandelier from the Jan Showers Collection

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Delicate honey tones in this calm interior space by Thomas OBrien

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L’Abeille de Guerlain or “bees of Guerlain”

was launched in late 2010 by  Guerlain, who’ve claimed the bee as their symbol since founder Pierre-François Pascal Guerlain created perfumes for Empress Eugenie Montijo, wife of Napoleon III.

The composition is based on notes of mimosa with the green hues of grape, orange blossom, jasmine, lilac, orris root and honey.

 The crystal bottle designed by Baccarat is shaped like a huge bee, with diamond faceted wings.

Each of the 47 vials made contain 245 ml of the perfume and cost $19,230

I hear you buzzing…

Yes, I did say $19,230.

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Photo via Dutch Fashion Awards 2010

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Gucci

Edouard Martinet sculpture

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As most of you probably already know, the Honeybee is in sharp decline but there are some native species out there just waiting for you to give them a good, happy home.

The Squash bee, Orchard mason bee, Mariola bee (one of the few native American bees that produces honey), and the Bumblebee are all great for  lending a hand (or is it a paw?) in the cultivating of your garden

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Slim Paley Photo

.Brood nests can be purchased online.

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 You first.

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If I do adopt some baby bees, this is definitely my choice for a bee-keeper’s hat

Tim Walker

I’m loving the skull pipe

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.Love these too;

Mind you, this little vintage chapeau makes a statement …

Oh- which would Daphne Guinness choose???

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Bee hives

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lost credit

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.Mabo Kids leggings & hat

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.Have you heard about the new documentary “Queen of The Sun: What Are the Bees Telling Us?”

  It’s an in-depth investigation into the causes and solutions behind Colony Collapse Disorder; a phenomenon where honeybees vanish from their hives, never to return.

Trailer for “Queen of The Sun” documentary

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Have a Sweet Week!

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Go Canucks! 🙂

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44 Comments

  1. Slim, we keep bees on our property, NO I don’t tend them, we have a beekeeper. I do not allow clover in our grass as I dislike the flavor…our honey tastes like liquid flowers!
    My husband (the tomato man/gardener) claims his yeild is twice what it was before we had bees. They are fascinating to watch…from far.

    • Mary, leaving the plants often considered “weeds”…dandelion, clover, joe pye weed, golden rod, and so many more, would definitely support honey bees and other pollinators. Instead, people tend to expend so much time, energy, and chemicals eradicating them, though these plants provide the nectar and pollen bees require.

      BTW, I am a beekeeper and I tend my own hives. ; )

      Slim, this is a beautiful salute to honey bees and pollinators. Thank you.

  2. Slim, you never cease to amaze me. As you know, I am ill and going through chemo.
    I delight in everything you do. Inspires me, delights me, I cant wait to get to the next pictures. I particularly loved the one recently on black lace. Amazing. Thank you for the gifts you are giving me during my brush with cancer. You are lightening my days.
    ox Leslie

    • To know that my posts help to brighten your days during this difficult period Leslie is a huge gift right back to me 🙂

  3. Don’t forget Napoleon’s obcession with bees. Embroidered in gold they were all over the imperial cloaks he and Josephine wore for their coronation. She even had one embroidered on toes of each of her white satin coronation slippers. They were also woven into fabrics for upholstery, carpets, curtains for their palaces and for Josephine’s Chateau de Malmaison. But to bring it up to date, when Napoleon originated the highest honor France can bestow, the Legion d’Honneur, in 1804, he had one of his beloved bees incorporated in the presentation medal design which is unchanged since 1804. Also on a more domestic level, keeping a jar of honey handy to the kitchen stove is a very good idea. Is great for burns.

  4. What a lovely post! I almost didn’t read it when I saw the title because my six-year-old son is driving me crazy about the bees. He’s so terrified that he sticks to me like glue whenever we’re outside, even just walking to the car. The other day I made him play outside and he came in sobbing, and said, “Mommy I don’t want you to think I’m weird but I’m scared of the bee-hee-heeeees!” It’s both sweet and infuriating 🙂

    I love your blog! You are so inspiring!

    • I know someone with a fear of bees like that- She even bought a beekeeper’s outfit, complete with headgear…not for tending bees of course, just to be able to go out in her garden without fear…or rather, with less fear!

  5. Merci, miel. Fabulously done. I am always toying with the idea of having bees at our place in the islands, where there is so much lavender, maybe this is the year. I love all of the honey colored fashions, it does make a sweet neutral.

  6. Speaking of Real Housewives of NYC – whaddya think of Ramona Singer? She’s a honey, huh? Geez between her and Sonja showing everyone her bruised butt and Alex breaking out in hives (see what I did there with the bee theme?), I wonder if Jill’s the only normal one.

    Must add another use for honey- peanut butter and honey sandwiches. Mmmm…add a few slices of banana too.

    • I’m afraid there’s no one that can vaguely be construed as normal on there Terri- I guess that’s why it’s so morbidly entertaining! If I HAD to pick, I’d say The Countess is the most ‘normal’ one.
      Now there’s a sentence I wouldn’t ever have foreseen writing.

  7. Ever try honey on pancakes with bananas? S.P. will you try the face masks recommended and let us know how ‘effective’ or ‘buzz worthy’ they are? Thanks for the inspiring pic’s!

  8. Slim,
    As usual I love your Posts, and so look forward to them, but your take on the horrible Real Housewives Series is dead on accurate. Just where do they find those people, and who acts like that? I cringe when I watch them. Your post with what’s his name in his atrocious speedo made me choke on my water! 🙂
    Thank you for saying what we are all thinking!
    Pam

  9. I just adore this post. As a child and being the youngest in my family all my brothers and sisters used to call me Bees Knees. Now they just call me Bee or Buzz so I really relate to Bees and just love them to bits especially the bumble bee. Thanks Slim – great pics as always……B:)

  10. OKAY..THIS HAS HELPED COMPLETE MY CHRISTMAS LIST FOR 2011.
    I HAD EVERY INTENTION OF GETTING ABSOLUTELY EVERYONE ON MY LENGTHY LIST L’Abeille de Guerlain.
    NOT ANY MORE. JUST A NICE BIG JAR OF GOOEY, GOLDEN
    HONEY FOR EVERYTHING FROM TEA TO BEAUTY TONICS.
    THANKS..YOU JUST SAVED ME A BEEBUNDLE!! X

  11. And another little tidbit..Edward Casey said ” one tablespoon of honey everyday for good health”, my grandmother followed this religiously. Great Post xxpeggybraswelldesign.com

  12. My husband and I were just discussing how we never see honey bees anymore. No one has clover in their yards anymore. I have a lot of flowers – but rarely see a bee. I’m looking forward to seeing “Queen of the Sun”

  13. Love all the bee inspired photos ! Especially the Thomas OBrien room, the Jan Showers lamp and the Gucci look! Such great photos, your blog is so inspiring!

    xxLily
    goldandgray.com

    • Two different Lily’s and you both posted one after another- how funny!
      and may I add, Lily is one of my favourite names (and my grandmother’s name 🙂 )

  14. I lived in my last home for 10 years. That home had a generous verandah. During our second summer and every year thereafter, the bumble bees arrived, building a hive between the verandah’s ceiling and roof. Ingress was created by the bees drilling 1/4″ holes along the soffit. As summer wore on, the bees of course grew, necessitating larger holes – and daily little drifts of sawdust dropping into my hair. That verandah was my office from May to October. I’d watch these bees grow so fat, it seemed impossible for them to stay aloft. But aloft, they stayed. When I wasn’t working on the verandah I was on my knees in the front gardens and there, working alongside me, would be the bees. I came to understand that they and I were not so different. I worked in the garden, they worked in the garden. I returned to the verandah, so did they. We all had work to do and shared home to return to. Occasionally, those bees would buzz about me, investigating or visiting, I’m not sure. We were always very relaxed with one another. I’ve moved now – far away – and my little pals did not follow. I wish they had – those fat little fellows were my constant companions for nine consecutive summers and I miss them.

    • Love this! I am always surrounded by bees in the garden too, at least I like to think they’re bees and not wasps 🙂 They never ever bother me, even when I’m cutting flowers or lavender they’re perched upon. Perhaps bees are like horses and sense when you are afraid?!

      • Yes, I think you are right with the horse analogy, Slim. I imagined that the bees understood that I was friend, not foe. However, I expect the affection ran in just one direction – away from me. Also, on the subject of horses – someone recently explained to me that as herbivores, horses have no predatory instincts – only the startle reflex of the preyed upon. And that that is the reason why they are so intuitive – they sense fear in others which in turn tells them to fear. Cool, huh? D.

  15. Thanks Slim! As a beekeeper this has to be my all time favourite post – amazing pictures, but I’ll pass on the honey mask and give the Bees Knees a try instead.

  16. Are you a Canucks fan? We’re from Vancouver (used to live there), so we’re huge fans of Canucks! 🙂

    So fun this post! I especially love seeing the beautiful lighting fixture designed by Jan Showers. She’s not only so talented but also a very sweet person.

    I hope you have a blessed week!

    xo

    Luciane at HomeBunch.com

    PS: I just posted a house in Santa Barbara and thought about you. 🙂

  17. Lovely post as always. I remember Taggart from college (Beloit College in Wisconsin), and he was an artistic force even then. I wish his film much success.

  18. My first time reading your blog. Spectacular and I will look forward to future postings.
    I have a passion for bees. I also paint in encaustic – beeswax and oil. The odour is marvelous – and the liminosity of the finished pieces does justice to the Queen Bee.

    Congratulations again

  19. Awesome post! The honey facial is on my list to try! Along with that drink. I’ll think of you…and these incredible images you’ve found. Thanks for the inspiration.

  20. love the golden hues of honey, the scent of the wax and so appreciate all the work those bees do. It’s amazing how so many translate the wonder of the bee into art, fashion and food. Beautiful post.

  21. Slim, I came upon your blog quite by (happy) accident, and love it, especially when you share pics of your beautiful roses! In a past post, you showed a photo of an amazing yellow rose that you called “Golden Mustard”. I have been looking everywhere and can’t find it online or anywhere else. I would love to add it to my rose garden. Would you mind sharing where you found it? Thanks,

  22. Sure Telly
    I believe I bought my Golden Mustard roses at Rose Story Farm, in Carpinteria, CA. They have a nice website- check it out!

  23. Loved every little thing about this honey bee blog
    I heard in Europe people have bee colonies on their roof tops
    Thanks for the inspiration

  24. Gorgeous post. I love the bee slippers.

    I swear by manuka honey.

    I’m trying not to spend money so I shall give the face mask a go. I’ll let you know how I get on! xx

Would love to hear from you!